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Z dentistry Blog

Posts for: December, 2012

NancyODellSpeaksOutOnHerExperiencesWithPregnancyGingivitis

When it comes to sensitive gums during pregnancy, Nancy O'Dell, the former co-anchor of Access Hollywood and new co-anchor of Entertainment Tonight, can speak from her own experience. In an interview with Dear Doctor magazine, she described the gum sensitivity she developed when pregnant with her daughter, Ashby. She said her dentist diagnosed her with pregnancy gingivitis, a condition that occurs during pregnancy and is the result of hormonal changes that increases blood flow to the gums. And based on her own experiences, Nancy shares this advice with mothers-to-be: use a softer bristled toothbrush, a gentle flossing and brushing technique and mild salt water rinses.

Before we continue we must share one important fact: our goal here is not to scare mothers-to-be, but rather to educate them on some of the common, real-world conditions that can occur during pregnancy. This is why we urge all mothers-to-be to contact us to schedule an appointment for a thorough examination as soon as they know they are pregnant to determine if any special dental care is necessary.

Periodontal (gum) disease can impact anyone; however, during pregnancy the tiny blood vessels of the gum tissues can become dilated (widened) in response to the elevated hormone levels of which progesterone is one example. This, in turn, causes the gum tissues to become more susceptible to the effects of plaque bacteria and their toxins. The warning signs of periodontal disease and pregnancy gingivitis include: swelling, redness, bleeding and sensitivity of the gum tissues. It is quite common during the second to eighth months of pregnancy.

Early gum disease, if left untreated, can progress to destructive periodontitis, which causes inflammation and infection of the supporting structures of the teeth. This can result in the eventual loss of teeth — again, if left untreated. Furthermore, there have been a variety of studies that show a positive link between preterm delivery and the presence of gum disease. There has also been a link between an increased rate of pre-eclampsia (high blood pressure during pregnancy) and periodontal disease. Researchers feel this suggests that periodontal disease may cause stress to the blood vessels of the mother, placenta and fetus.

To learn more about this topic, continue reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Pregnancy and Oral Health.” And if you want to read the entire feature article on Nancy O'Dell, continue reading “Nancy O'Dell.”


WithoutRetainersYourInvestmentinYourChildsTeethMayBeWasted

The much anticipated day has arrived: your child's braces have been removed. You are really happy with the way your son's or daughter's smile looks now. All the time, money, and discomfort of having teeth straightened have been well worth it.

But did you know that the teeth could relapse into their old positions if your child doesn't wear a retainer every night?

Why is wearing a retainer necessary?
It is important for both you and your child to understand the reason for wearing a retainer. It has to do with how orthodontia works in causing teeth to move to more satisfactory positions.

The reason that orthodontia (“ortho” – straight, “odont” – tooth) works is that the tissues holding teeth in place are living and keep remodeling themselves. Teeth are suspended in the jawbone by the periodontal ligament (“peri” – around, “odont” – tooth), which suspends the tooth by extending from the cementum of the tooth on one side into the bone on the other. Cementum is the thin layer of calcified tissue covering the dentin of the root. When light forces are placed on it, the periodontal ligament can reform itself and adapt to the pressures it is under.

Orthodontists know how to keep the pressures during orthodontic treatment light enough to cause movement that is slow and steady but not so strong that the tissues are damaged. If too much force is applied, the process can cause damage to the periodontal tissues and tooth roots.

When the teeth have moved to their desired positions, they will continue slowly moving. The purpose of a retainer is to stabilize the teeth in their “finished” position. They must be retained in this position long enough that the bone and ligament can completely re-form around them, a process that can take several months.

Make it clear to your child that a retainer won't have to be worn forever. Once your child understands that it is very important to wear the retainer for a few months in order to stabilize that attractive new smile, it should be easy to convince him or her to use it nightly.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment to discuss your questions about retainers. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Why Orthodontic Retainers?