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Z dentistry Blog

Posts for: September, 2014

ExtendtheLifeofYourDentalApplianceWithProperCare

Your dental appliance plays a big role in restoring function and improving your appearance. Taking proper care of it will ensure it can do that for a long time.

Cleaning is a top priority. Though it might seem natural to use toothpaste, you should avoid using it on your appliance. The abrasives in toothpaste are necessary to break up plaque on natural teeth’s hard enamel surfaces, but will leave micro scratches on the surface of your appliance that eventually become havens for bacterial growth — a sure recipe for discoloration and unpleasant odors. If you plan to use boiling or hot water to disinfect your appliance, don’t. The heat distorts the plastic and can disrupt its precise mouth fit. You should also avoid using bleach because it can break down the composition of the plastic, can leave a strong odor, and can whiten the pink “gum tissue” areas of the denture.

Instead, use plain liquid detergent or hand soap with warm water to clean your appliance — and use a brush designed for it rather than your toothbrush. If you have a long-term appliance like a denture, you might consider investing in an ultra-sonic cleaner that uses high frequency sound vibrations to clean out small crevices a brush can’t reach.

Remember the old saying, “familiarity breeds contempt?” With dental appliances, too much time in the mouth breeds bacteria. Dentures, for example, should be taken out at night to allow saliva and its antibacterial capacity to work in your mouth. You also should be on the lookout for signs of infection — if anything appears amiss, contact us for an exam as soon as possible to minimize the effects of tooth decay or gum disease.

One final item: be careful where you place your appliance when it’s not in your mouth. Lying out in the open (like on a nightstand) is a tempting lure for the family pet or a curious child. Keep it in its case in accordance with the care instructions given you when you received your appliance.

Doing the right things — and avoiding the wrong things — when caring for your dental appliance will go a long way to increasing its life and reducing problems along the way.

If you would like more information on caring for your oral appliance, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


TVAnchorNancyODellDiscussesPregnancyandOralHealth

We've all heard of morning sickness, but did you know that it's also not unusual for pregnant women to experience oral discomfort? This is what Entertainment Tonight co-host Nancy O'Dell discovered when she was expecting her daughter, Ashby. In an exclusive interview with Dear Doctor magazine, Nancy described how her gums became extra-sensitive during pregnancy, leading her dentist to diagnose her with “pregnancy gingivitis” (“gingival” – gum tissue; “itis” – inflammation).

“While my dental health has always been relatively normal, pregnancy did cause me some concern about my teeth and gums,” Nancy said. “With my dentist's advice and treatment, the few problems I had were minimized,” she said.

It's especially important to maintain good oral hygiene during pregnancy with routine brushing and flossing, and regular professional cleanings. This will reduce the accumulation of the dental bacterial plaque that leads to gum disease. Both mother and child are particularly vulnerable to these bacteria during this sensitive time. Scientific studies have established a link between preterm delivery and the presence of periodontal (gum) disease in pregnant women. Also, the elevated hormone levels of pregnancy cause the tiny blood vessels of the gum tissues to become dilated (widened) and therefore more susceptible to the effects of plaque bacteria and their toxins. Gingivitis is especially common during the second to eighth months of pregnancy.

Excess bacterial plaque can occasionally lead to another pregnancy-related condition in the second trimester: an overgrowth of gum tissue called a “pregnancy tumor.” In this case, “tumor” means nothing more than a swelling or growth. Pregnancy tumors, usually found between the teeth, are completely benign but they do bleed easily and are characterized by a red, raw-looking mulberry-like surface. They can be surgically removed if they do not resolve themselves after the baby is born.

If you are experiencing any pregnancy-related oral health issues, please contact us today to schedule an appointment for a consultation. If you would like to read Dear Doctor's entire interview with Nancy O'Dell, please see “Nancy O'Dell.” Dear Doctor also has more on “Pregnancy and Oral Health: Everything You Always Wanted To Know But Never Knew To Ask.”