6140 Mae Anne Avenue Suite 2
Reno, NV 89523

Z dentistry Blog

Posts for: December, 2016

By Z Dentistry
December 25, 2016
Category: Oral Health
NoGleeinToothGrinding

Sure, it’s big news when celebs tweet selfies from the dental office… if you’re still living in the 20th century. But in Hollywood today, it’s harder to say who hasn’t posted snaps of themselves in the dentist’s chair than who has. Yet the pictures recently uploaded to Twitter by Mark Salling, the actor and singer who regularly appears as Noah “Puck” Puckerman on the popular TV series Glee, made us sit up and take notice.

“Getting my chipped tooth fixed. Also, apparently, I’m a big grinder,” read the caption. The photo showed a set of upper front teeth with visible chips on the biting surface. What’s so special about this seemingly mundane tweet? It’s a great way of bringing attention to a relatively common, but often overlooked problem: teeth clenching and grinding, also called bruxism.

Although bruxism is a habit that affects scores of people, many don’t even realize they have it. That’s because the condition may only become active at night. When the teeth are unconsciously ground together, the forces they produce can wear down the enamel, cause chipping or damage to teeth or dental work (such as veneers or fillings), or even loosen a tooth! While it’s common in children under 11 years old, in adults it can be a cause for concern.

Sometimes, mouth pain, soreness and visible damage alert individuals to their grinding habits; other times, a dental professional will notice the evidence of bruxism during an exam or cleaning: tooth sensitivity and telltale wear and tear on the chewing surfaces. Either way, it’s time to act.

Bruxism is most often caused by stress, which can negatively impact the body in many ways. It may also result from bite problems, the overuse of stimulating substances (caffeine, alcohol, tobacco, and illegal drugs), and as a side effect of certain medications. Sometimes, simply becoming aware of the habit can help a person get it under control. Common methods of stress reduction include exercise, meditation, a warm bath or a quiet period before bedtime; these can be tried while we monitor the situation to see if the problem is going away.

If stress reduction alone doesn’t do the trick, several other methods can be effective. When bruxism is caused by a minor bite problem, we can sometimes do a minor “bite adjustment” in the office. This involves removing a tiny bit of enamel from an individual tooth that is out of position, bringing it in line with the others. If it’s a more serious malocclusion, orthodontic appliances or other procedures may be recommended.

When grinding is severe enough to damage teeth or dental work, we may also recommend a custom-made night guard (occlusal guard), which you put in your mouth at bedtime. Comfortable and secure, this appliance prevents your teeth from being damaged by contacting each other, and protects your jaw joints from stresses due to excessive grinding forces.

Whether or not you have to smile for a living, teeth grinding can be a big problem. If you would like more information about this condition, call our office to schedule a consultation for a consultation.


By Z Dentistry
December 22, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene   flossing  

Find out why flossing is a crucial element to keeping your smile clean and healthy.

It’s second nature to brush your teeth but do you feel the same way about flossing? While brushing will certainly keep your smile looking flossingits best, if you aren’t flossing then you are missing out on one very important part of oral care. From the office of our Reno, NV dentist, Dr. George Zatarain discovers the importance behind flossing.

Think of flossing like dish washing. You wouldn’t only wash the top part of the plate and forget to clean the sides of it, would you? This isn’t getting your dishes thoroughly clean and could leave nasty bacteria on it. Well, the same goes for your teeth.

If you brush your teeth and forget to floss, you are leaving plaque and food to sit in between teeth. Besides the ugly stains, this can cause it to increase your chances of developing decay. In order to really get in between the teeth where your toothbrush just can’t you’ll need to floss.

Floss is the most effective way to break up and remove plaque from between teeth. Whenever you don’t floss you leave plaque to build up in the nooks and crannies of your teeth, which can also lead to issues like gum disease and potential tooth loss. Plus, flossing your teeth every day guarantees you much fresher breath!

You should be flossing at least once a day, preferably at night before you brush. For proper removal of plaque from between teeth, first use fluoridated toothpaste while brushing your teeth, it is better able to reach in between teeth and give a more thorough clean. Use a generous amount of floss and use a new, clean section for each tooth. Make sure to get all the way to the gum line to remove plaque that might be forming underneath. If you aren’t sure which techniques to use or what floss is right for you, our Reno general dentist is always here to provide some helpful advice, so don’t hesitate to call us and ask.

While flossing is necessary for keeping your smile cavity-free, so are six-month dental cleanings and exams. If it’s time for your biannual cleaning, then call Z Dentistry in Reno, NV today.


By Z Dentistry
December 10, 2016
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral cancer  
KeepanEyeonYourOralHealthduringCancerTreatment

A third of people treated for cancer develop adverse side effects within their mouth. But while these effects can be devastating to teeth and gums, there are ways to minimize the damage.

Treatments like chemotherapy and radiation work by destroying cancer cells. Unfortunately, they may also destroy normal cells. The accumulation of this “collateral damage” ultimately affects uninvolved areas and organ systems of the body. Chemotherapy, for example, can interrupt bone marrow blood cell formation and decrease the body's ability to fight infection.

These ripple effects can eventually reach the mouth. It's not uncommon for cancer patients to develop mouth sores or see an increase in tooth decay or periodontal (gum) disease. The treatments may also inhibit saliva flow: because saliva neutralizes acid and provides other benefits that lower disease risk, dental disease is more likely to develop when the salivary flow is reduced.

The first step to minimizing these effects is to improve oral health before cancer treatment begins. An unhealthy mouth vastly increases the chances for problems during treatment. Cooperating with your cancer physicians, we should attempt to treat any diseases present as soon as possible.

During cancer treatment we should also monitor your oral health and intervene when appropriate. If at all possible, you should continue regular dental visits for cleaning and checkups, and more so if conditions warrant. We can also protect your teeth and gums with protective measures like antibacterial mouth rinses, saliva stimulation or high-potency fluoride applications for your enamel.

What's most important, though, is what you can do for yourself to care for your mouth during the treatment period. Be sure to brush daily with a soft-bristle brush and fluoride toothpaste. You can use a weak solution of one-quarter teaspoon each of salt and baking soda to a quart of warm water to rinse your mouth and soothe any sores. And be sure to drink plenty of water to reduce dry mouth.

While you're waging your battle against cancer, stay vigilant about your teeth and gums. Taking care of them will ensure that after you've won your war against this malignant foe your mouth will be healthy too.

If you would like more information on taking care of your teeth and gums during cancer treatment, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Oral Health During Cancer Treatment.”